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Available sculpture by Vivian Wang November 2019

Vivian Wang Glass Sculpture
City Kids & Shanghai Deco (Stories below the images)

Vivian has recently completed five new works available through Habatat. This new body of work will be on display at Habatat Prime and Sofa chicago. Contact Habatat to receive information on upcoming available work.

 

- Stories for each work are below the images - 

Contact Habatat at 248.554.0590 & [email protected]

  Vivian Wang - City Kids  
  Vivian Wang Glass Sculpture   Vivian Wang Glass Sculpture  
  Mini Argyle, 2019 SOLD
23 x 11 x 8 inches
Cast glass, stoneware, steel base
$14,800 
  (One of Three in this Series)
Contact Habatat HERE
See the drawing Here at www.CityKidsLimited.com
 
      Click HERE for more images of each work  
  Vivian Wang Glass Sculpture   Vivian Wang Glass Sculpture  
  Mini Cape, 2019 SOLD
22.5 x 11 x 8 inches
Cast glass, stoneware, steel base
$14,800 
 
  (One of Three in this Series) 
Contact Habatat HERE
See the drawing Here at www.CityKidsLimited.com
 
      Click HERE for more images of each work  
  Vivian Wang - Shanghai Deco  
  Vivian Wang Glass Sculpture   Vivian Wang Glass Sculpture  
  Lady Dragon, 2019 SOLD
33 x 14 x 14 inches
Cast glass, stoneware, gemstones, gold leaf, steel base
$29,800
  Moonstone, Citrine, Garnet, Crystal, Red Gold
Contact Habatat HERE
 


Vivian has shared her thoughts about each work:

   

CITY KIDS - Children of the 50’s

Why children of the 50’s? Because I was a child of the 50’s. This is my story and these are my memories. Born in Shanghai, I emigrated with my parents first to Vancouver, Canada and then, in 1953, to Pacific Grove, California. I was in grade school then and already fascinated with the American way of life, especially the American way of dressing. I desperately wanted to wear American clothes so that I might assimilate as soon as I possibly could. My mother still wore her Cheongsam, the traditional slim fitting dress with a mandarin collar, while I began to dress American, happily sporting my new starched poufy dresses with layers of crinolines. All around me were boys and girls dressed as kids did in America in the 1950s and I wanted to be one of them. This was an important period in my life and I fondly remember what everyone wore. These two sculptures were inspired by my memories of that time.

Mini Cape” shows a young girl in a coat I always dreamed of owning as a child. Though I had always wanted a bright red coat, my conservative parents made me wear a dull brown coat instead. The grey pleated shoulder cape and black trim (on red) was a very fashionable style for kids in post-war America.

Mini Argyle” portrays a little boy with a bowl cut hairdo. Remember Buster Brown? He is wearing a blue blazer, his Sunday best, with a white shirt and tie. Looking almost like a formal school uniform, this was very popular style in the 50’s. He has dressed himself in his typical Fair Isle (argyle) sweater vest, not realizing, or perhaps not caring, that the vest is too long for the blazer.


SHANGHAI DECO

Last year, I visited Shanghai where I was delighted and fascinated by its stunning Art Deco buildings, many of which line the seaside area of the city known as the Bund. During Shanghai’s Golden Age, the 1920s through 1930s, the city saw the construction of many exquisite exteriors and interiors that were heavily influenced by the European Deco style. Even today, Shanghai has the richest collection of Art Deco architecture in the world. The Shanghai Deco style, a mix of traditional Chinese and Western Deco, shaped not only the architecture of the city but heavily influenced its fashion as well.

This mix of traditional Chinese and Western Deco style inspired my new collection, “Shanghai Deco.” To my eye, Art Deco is a showcase of extreme opulence and sleek structural shapes. The patterning is geometric and the “ideal” human form became lean and elongated. The greatest influence on the Shanghai Deco style came not only from the French and English who moved there in the 20’s and 30’s, but also from the popularity of American Movies.

LADY DRAGON was inspired by images of Anna May Wong, a Chinese American movie actress of the 20’s and 30’s. Famous for roles that portrayed stereotypical Chinese women, she appeared in countless films. Her career began during the silent film era and continued through the advent of the talkies. LADY DRAGON wears a stylish and luxurious pair of Chinese pajamas embroidered with traditional Chinese dragons on her sleeves. The other patterning on her attire is all geometric Deco forms. Her hair style is a mix of East and West, featuring Anna May Wong’s signature shaped bangs.

Call 248.554.0590 and mention Vivian Wang


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HABATAT GALLERIES

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Royal Oak, MI 48073

248.554.0590

[email protected]

  ArtPalmBeach 2014 Habatat Galleries