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I was a long-distance runner indeed. I was born in 1945, I participated in athletics, and I was junior Hungarian champion in javelin throw in 1962. At the age of 42, I decided to run the marathon, so I trained for it and successfully completed eight, including the New York marathon in 1999. I obtained a master’s degree in sociology, but I started to show an interest in minerals, crystals and glass as a hobby. After testing my skills at home for many years, I founded my workshop in 1989 and started to use optical glass with my associates to produce high precision glass components for optical instruments and industrial devices, manufacturing glass trophies, too, just for fun. Orders from the industry represented an ongoing technical challenge, but they also catered for a continuous intellectual development. In the meantime, I have always been experimenting in and later focusing on arts, a long-time favorite of mine. For me, geometric abstract art and minimalism are number one priority. I try to keep alive, preserves and upholds the well-known Hungarian art traditions hallmarked by Lajos Kassak, Victor Vasarely and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy.

First my hobby, then my work and goal in life, the science of light and optics became my main occupation, about which I later tutored the students of Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Budapest. This knowledge is manifest proficiently in my sculptures. When I am making sculptures, I shape the optical glass components by cold working, using blocks and prisms, which are cut into a few components only. These are then buffed, polished and glued, repeating this process many times. My structures consist of simple geometric shapes. Using different component sizes, adhesives, matte and glossy finish, and optical glasses of different colours and different refractive indices, a richness of wide-ranging internal images appear in my art. My works are rightly called geometric baroque sculptures.

At the age of 59, my first solo exhibition with the title Kockázat (A Square Deal) was organized in Hungary’s first glass art gallery in 2004. Since then, I have been exhibiting continuously in Europe and the US, and also in China. Two large public sculptures I made were installed in Hungary and I also wrote a book. To me, due to the application of optical glass, the external and internal shapes, the reflections
within the sculptures, the interferences, the colours and the lights are equally important. I am seeking the equilibrium of these factors in my works. I have been focusing recently on the relationship among the directed lights, my sculptures and their environment. Certain sculptures consist of a set of lenses and prisms, under the influence of Laszlo Moholy-Nagy’s works (Light-Space Modulator – 1930) and George Kepes’s works.

I am still a long-distance runner, except that I run the ‘glass marathon’ now. I am still in the process of developing my glass art on a step-by-step basis to please collectors and glass sculpture fans.