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Available sculpture by Vivian Wang April 2017

Vivian Wang Habatat Galleries

*There is a premium cost for these works that include the semi-precious stone and crystal embellishments*

 



Vivian Wang Glass Sculpture
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Please enjoy these images and see the works LIVE at Habatat Galleries 45th Glass International Award Exhibition- contact the gallery info@habatat.com

- Stories for each work are below the images -

  Vivian Wang Habatat Galleries   Vivian Wang Habatat Galleries   Vivian Wang Habatat Galleries  
  Flower Girl, 2017
( Detail ) 
Includes:
Peridot, Moonstone, Iolite, Mother
 of Pearl, Garnet, Crystal
  Flower Girl, 2017 SOLD
26 x 13 x 11"
Cast Glass, Stoneware
Gemstones, Steel Base
$27,800
  Flower Girl, 2017
( Detail ) 
Includes:
Peridot, Moonstone, Iolite, Mother
 of Pearl, Garnet, Crystal
 
             

  Vivian Wang Habatat Galleries   Vivian Wang Habatat Galleries   Vivian Wang Habatat Galleries  
  Lion Head, 2017
( Detail ) 
Includes:
Citrine, Garnet,
Moonstone, Crystal
  Lion Head, 2017 SOLD
28 x 13 x 13"
Cast Glass, Stoneware
Gemstones, Steel Base
$27,800
  Lion Head, 2017
( Detail ) 
Includes:
Citrine, Garnet,
Moonstone, Crysta
 
             
  Vivian Wang Habatat Galleries   Vivian Wang Habatat Galleries    Vivian Wang Habatat Galleries  
  Fans, 2017
( Detail )
Includes:
Garnet, Moonstone, Faux Pearl, Crystal
  Fans, 2017 SOLD
24 x13 x 9"
Cast Glass, Stoneware
Gemstones, Steel Base
$25,800
  Fans, 2017
( Detail )
Includes:
Garnet, Moonstone, Faux Pearl, Crystal
 

Vivian has shared her thoughts about each work:

 

“Flower Girl” portrays a Chinese girl of nobility during the Qing Dynasty (1644 - 1911). She wears a long “Gua,” a tunic jacket with a front closure made of “frog” buttons. This detail was typical of Qing Dynasty court attire. The large circular design motifs at the bodice and on the sleeves were also popular during that era. These floral design decorations on her clothing emphasize the Lotus flower (there are 6 around the neckline and 2 at the front hem). The Lotus represents the holy seat of Buddha and because this flower rises from the mud and blooms with such beauty, it symbolizes perfection and purity.

“Glass Lion” portrays a young Chinese boy at the court of the Qing Dynasty. He wears a hat with a lion’s face. In China, the lion is regarded as the king of the forests and the animals. It has long been used as a symbol of power and grandeur. Consequently, statues of lions were often used to guard the gates and doors of shrines and temples. The use of the lion as a symbol had its origin during the Tang Dynasty (618-907). Interestingly, there were no lions in China. The design of the guardian lions is believed to have been influenced by lion pelts the Chinese acquired and by depictions of lions the Chinese would have witnessed through trade with the Middle East and India, where lions actually existed. In those places, the lion was also a symbol of power and strength.

“Fan” portrays a young Japanese girl of nobility wearing a red dress embellished with “fan” motifs. The importance of fans in Japanese culture dates from the Heian Period (794AD - 1185). The “Sensu” or folding fan was used by nobility and monks as an accessory and a ceremonial item in early Japanese culture. Fans were also used in the performing arts and in tea ceremonies. Originally, only the Emperor was permitted to use the “Hoigi” or Japanese court fan, but eventually it was used by all levels of aristocracy. Throughout Japanese history the fan was seen as the symbol of prosperity and became a popular motif in clothing design.


Call 248.554.0590 and mention Vivian Wang


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HABATAT GALLERIES

4400 Fernlee Ave.

Royal Oak, MI 48073

248.554.0590

info@habatat.com

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